Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  74 / 116 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 74 / 116 Next Page
Page Background

74

/

Flight Time

/

JANUARY 2019

Business Focus

Meaningful

mentoring

EXPERTS EXPLAIN HOW

TO ADD REAL VALUE

THROUGH MENTORING

lthough the way we work has

changed dramatically over the

years, the value of learning from

the experience of others hasn’t.

The relationship between a

mentor and a mentee is a dynamic that has

been playing out for centuries, and today it is

as important as ever, enabling a generation

of professionals and entrepreneurs to become

future leaders by learning from their more

experienced peers.

In order for mentoring to be successful for

both parties, however, it needs to be done right.

We spoke to a panel of experts to get their

advice on how to ensure that mentoring really

is a meaningful and productive experience.

Alex Moyle

( www.alexmoyle.co.uk )

,

business development and sales expert,

and author of

Business Development

Culture – Taking sales culture beyond the

sales team, says:

The key to being a great mentor is to remember

that you are there to guide, help and support the

mentee to navigate the world or workplace on

their own. The job of a mentor is not to direct

or tell – the mentee already has their manager

for that.

This is actually harder than you think. The

natural instinct of mentees is to ask, ‘what

should I do?’ Mentors need to resist the urge to

answer every question. The goal of any mentor

should be to ensure that most of the talking

comes from the mentee, because sometimes just

being able to share a problem or situation is all

someone needs to make it better.

When a mentor does need to give more

support, the most powerful words in their

armoury are why and what. Why, to encourage

their mentee to think about their situation and

assess why they are thinking or feeling the way

they are. What, to encourage the mentee to

think about what their options are to resolve

their challenge or change the way they feel.

This way, the mentor is helping the mentee to

be self-sufficient in navigating the challenges

they find. As the saying goes: Give a person a

fish and they will eat for a day, teach them to

fish and they will feed themselves forever.

Helen Corbishley, an Associate at Frost

Included

( www.frostincluded.com )

, a

consultancy dedicated to helping people

understand diversity and inclusion, says:

It is universally recognised that there are

numerous benefits to mentoring. These

extend to mentor and mentee, as well as

organisations as a whole. A 2011 study by

A

“The goal of any

mentor should be to

ensure that most of

the talking comes

from the mentee,

because sometimes

just being able to

share a problem or

situation is all

someone needs to

make it better”